A Proper Wine Blog

Dedication:
I would like to thank Little Man, not only for taking two[1] great naps yesterday, but for having an excellent independent play session this morning which allowed me to drink some wine and write this blog.

It seems like its been awhile since I actually blogged about wine. I’m not gonna lie, wine consumption is WAY down since Little Man joined us. It’s difficult to stay awake past 9 pm, let alone have a glass of wine at night after he goes to sleep. And my palate really is different. Flavors aren’t jumping out at me like they did before, and I’m much more comfortable drinking low-key, smooth wines rather than big, complex and tannic ones[2].

And surprisingly, I’ve been much more into beer. During my pregnancy I didn’t crave much in terms of food, but I DID crave beer. All I wanted was a big frothy Guinness. Not a glass of wine, not a bottle of Champagne, but Guinness. So random, I know. I’ve indulged in that a few times, but you can really only drink so many pints of Guinness before it’s a bit overwhelming[3].

So slowly[4] but surely, I’m getting back in the swing of things. And I decided to do a proper wine blog about a lovely bottle of Riesling I’ve been saving.

2012 Gustave Lorentz Lieu-Dit Burg Riesling
2012 Gustave Lorentz Lieu-Dit Burg Riesling

__________________________________________________________________________
To:                  Alleged Blog Readers
From:              Wine Esquire
Date:               February 10-11, 2018
Wine:              2012 Gustave Lorentz Lieu-Dit Burg Riesling[5]
__________________________________________________________________________

Beautiful nose, it smells thick and juicy, full of flavor. Great mouthfeel too, medium bodied, it refreshingly coats your mouth. I’m getting pineapple like crazy, but not too sweet, a hint of green apple too. A dash of minerality rounds this out for a perfect finish. The color is gorgeous; like thick, golden honey. Not much in the way of legs, it almost coats the glass then disappears like condensation without any tears left behind.

I could seriously do with some cheese on apple slices to pair with this, but Little Man is napping and I only have so much time 😉

This Riesling from Alsace, France by producer Gustave Lorentz, specifically their 2012 Lieu-Dit[6] Burg Riesling. The Maison Gustave Lorentz has been making wine since 1836, beginning with a 33 hectare[7] vineyard in Bergheim, in the heart of Alsace, just half an hour from the German border. Now, six generations later, the same family continues their winemaking tradition. The wines of Gustave Lorentz are certified organic by Ecocert[8] and have been since 2012. The estate grown Riesling, Pinot-Gris, Gewurztraminer, Muscat and Pinot Noir are all harvested and vinified separately, allowing each grape to express the unique terroir from which it hails.

This bottle came to me as a sample[9] from Quintessential Wines, a Napa-based importer with a  focus on multi-generational, family owned-and-operated wineries, and their portfolio is pretty impressive.

wine
Feels like spring!

This particular vintage seems particularly difficult to get your hands on at the moment, but other offerings from this winemaker are widely available online and throughout the US.

Until the next glass, Cheers!

Lawyer Footnote

[1] Yes, TWO both for over an hour and a half! This is from the boy who went the previous 48 hours with only sporadic 30-minute naps. (Except at night when he sleeps 10 hours at a clip. I know, I know, I’m so lucky)

[2] I’ve also not had much time to sit down and explore flavors. Can’t imagine why.

[3] And filling! I can see why they call it a “meal in a glass!”

[4] Very slowly.

[5] This particular vintage earned a 91 score from Wine Enthusiast.

[6] Lieu Dit translates to “said location” and is a wine term used for identifying very small and particular geographical locations. Not to be confused with the California winery Lieu Dit. (Confession: I was confused. As a trademark attorney, I may have pushed the California guys toward another name. #lawyerlife)

[7] 1 hectare is equal to approximately 2.47105 acres; so 33 hectares is approximately 81.5448 acres.

[8] When you see this little green label flag on European wines, you’ll know its certified organic by Ecocert.

ecocert organic wine
Ecocert Organic

[9] Opinions contained herein are my own. If I didn’t like it, I would have poured it down the drain and saved you the trouble of reading this.

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